stephanie syjuco

 

PROJECTS 
 

RECENT

> Modern Ruins (Popular Cannibals)
> Re-Mediation Lab
> Afghanicraftistan
> Empire/Other
> Ultimate Fabrication Challenge (Fauxrijuana)
> CHATFACE
> The Precariat (Material Witnesses)
> Cargo Cults: Object Agents
> Neutral Displays (Small Dilemmas)
> Ultimate Vision (Dazzle Camouflage)
> Dazzle Camouflage Propositions
> Ornament and Crime (Villa Savoye)
> Speculative Propositions
> Excess Capital
> FREE TEXTS: An Open Source Reading Room
> The International Orange Commemorative Store (A Proposition)
> RAIDERS
> Phantoms (H_RT F D_RKN_SS)
> Pattern Migration
> Shadowshop
> Learning to Love You (All)
> Particulate Matter: Things, Thingys, Thingies
> notMOMA
> COPYSTAND: An Autonomous Manufacturing Zone
> Custom Transitional Utility Object (Morris Mover)
> Temporal Aggregate (Borrowed Beuys)
> Anti-Factory Bristol
> Towards a New Theory of Color Reading
> The Berlin Wall
> Counterfeit Crochet Project (Critique of a Political Economy)


Black Markets 
Mis-Productions
Self Constructions 

 

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Partial installation view: showroom area


Partial installation view: showroom area


Eames Lounger (cardboard, foam, paint, wire, wood, hot glue, buttons, string, paint)








Partial installation view: reverse side: neutralized objects








Modern Ruins (Popular Cannibals)
2014

Double-sided installation using all scavenged materials.


Held in conjunction with a four-month residency at Recology San Francisco, a unique program that gives access to artists to work on-site with materials scavenged from the city "dump."


From the press release:


For Modern Ruins (Popular Cannibals), Stephanie Syjuco takes beloved archetypes of modernist furniture and reproduces them dump-style to explore a range of ideas related to production, consumption, class, and economies. Continuing her investigation of copies and counterfeits, her George Nelson tables and Verner Panton lamps speak to how today’s reproductions are generations removed from their furniture forbearers. These iconic objects have been knocked-off or borrowed from so often that many people may think they originated at Ikea or Crate and Barrel.

By exploring these forms, questions arise as to the original intent behind the designs and their meaning in today’s world where the clean lines of modern furniture often serve as signifiers of an affluent, idealized lifestyle.

Using what she describes as a “shanty-like” aesthetic, Syjuco’s reproductions are certainly not meant to fool anyone or be functional. Instead, they bring the sleek, modern ideal into collision with the scavenged and cobbled-together through the immediate use of materials in rudimentary constructions. The works speak to the shoddy materials and cheap labor used to produce affordable contemporary modern furniture, and like the remnants of a dying civilization, suggest societal and environmental collapse.

Calling on her own memories of the Philippines where International Style buildings stood alongside slums and shanties, Syjuco’s work also references Modernism’s long and complicated relationship to developing countries—how decades ago these new urban spaces adapted and formed their own versions of Modernist architecture which in many cases are now dilapidated signs of the promise of utopian progress.

The installation is double-sided, with the back side presenting an array of "neutralized" ashen grey objects -- a still-life inspired by contemporary scenes of destruction, political protest, and ruin. Flags, Molotov cocktails, gas cannisters, liquor bottles, cans of food, baskets, metal piping, obsolete media equipment, and much more are arranged on platforms of wooden pallets.


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Partial installation view: Mood Board

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